The Relocation Bureau

Education

Our education section provides impartial and useful information on both UK State (free of charge) and private (fee paying) schools and nurseries. If you’re searching for suitable schools, why not use our school search service to speed things up?

If you’re looking at a potential property and want to easily find out school options, please use our schools map. You can enter either the location, or the full postcode(e.g. AA1 1AA), or just the first part of the postcode (e.g. AA1).

EDUCATION IN THE UK

For parents with school-age children, the initial task in any move is to locate potentially suitable schools, determine the availability of places, and visit a selection of the better prospects. Where a child's education is at a difficult or demanding stage, as is often the case with teenagers, family perception of the move can be very mixed.

The Relocation Bureau offers a comprehensive school search service to help you to find schools that meet your needs.

More Info

The information provided on education on this website is there to help you to understand the structure of education in the UK and to advise you of the many options that are available to you.

Our General Information section also contains information on Compulsory School Age; School Terms, Hours and Holidays; Curriculum & Examinations; Special Needs Education; School Travel and Transport; and Nursery Schools.

State or Independent School?

One of the most important decisions facing newcomers to Britain is whether to send their children to a state school, which is free of charge, or to an independent school, which is normally fee-paying.

Most children in the UK are educated in the State school system but many more parents are now making financial sacrifices to have their children educated in private independent schools.

Independent schools are available for children aged 4 to 18. Where you live will significantly influence your decision on whether to use state or independent education. You will be able to visit the schools in your area before making this important decision.

What's In A Name?

How we, in the UK, refer to the types of school can be confusing when you come here from another country so what do these school categories mean?

By state school, we mean the free-of-charge education service provided nationally by the UK Department for Education (DfE). Schools with religious affiliations are also available. Many state schools provide an education which is as good as most independent schools. All state schools provide some special needs education.

An independent school is fee-paying, and is also often referred to as a private school. Note that admission to a state school for foreign children is dependent on the type and duration of the residence permit granted to their parents and attendance may not always be possible. An independent or international school will then be your only option.

Fee-paying international schools are available in the UK and are particularly useful for older children who have often studied a different curriculum to that in common use in the UK. Many parents will require their children to be educated to a similar standard and in a similar environment to the schools in their own country.

A public school is one of the top ranking fee-paying independent schools, such as Eton, or Harrow.

www.etoncollege.com
www.harrowschool.org.uk

GENERAL INFORMATION

Compulsory School Age

By law, all children of compulsory school age (between 5 and 16) must get a proper full-time education. Unless you are going to educate your child at home, they must go to school, by law (1944 Education Act), at the start of the first term after their fifth birthday. They don't have to go to school before that point.

However, your child does have a right to free education before then. From the start of the first term after they reach the age of four, all children are entitled to three terms of free, part-time education in nursery schools.

School Terms, Hours & Holidays

These notes refer to mainstream UK state schools. Many independent schools have slightly longer holidays.

International schools often have different hours, and holiday dates may be at completely different times of the year. Many also observe non-UK national holidays (e.g. Thanksgiving).

School hours vary from school to school, but are usually from 09.00 to 15.30 or 16.00 with a 1 hour lunch break at 12.00.

School days are Monday to Friday. Many senior schools will play sports on a Saturday morning.

The school year is from September to middle of July and is currently divided into three terms. There is a 5 or 6 week break between school years.

  • Autumn Term
    1st week of September to 1 week before Christmas

  • Spring Term
    1st week of January to Easter

  • Summer Term
    2 weeks after Easter to 3rd week of July

There is a one week break approximately half way through each term.

The three term year may be changed to a four term year some time in the future.

School Term Dates

The direct .gov website provides a list of term dates as a guide to schools and Local Education Authorities (LEAs). Each school or LEA may have slight variations, particularly on half term dates. Check with your school.
www.gov.uk/school-term-holiday-dates

UK Public Holidays

The direct .gov website has a list of the dates of the UK public holidays. Schools will be closed on these dates.
www.gov.uk/bank-holidays

Curriculum & Examinations

For excellent information about the National Curriculum visit the direct .gov website
www.gov.uk/national-curriculum/overview

At A Glance Guide
School Age Stage Examinations Subjects
Nursery & Pre-School 3 to 4 None
Primary - Infant 5 to 7 Key Stage 1 (KS1) National Curriculum Test English & Mathematics
Primary - Junior 8 to 11 Key Stage 2 (KS2) National Curriculum Test English & Mathematics
Secondary 11 to 14 Key Stage 3 (KS3) National Curriculum Test English, Mathematics & Science
Secondary 15 to 16 Key Stage 4 (KS4) General Certification of Secondary Education (GCSEs) Usually between 5 and 8 subjects (up to 10)
Secondary or 6th Form College or Technical School 17 to 18 Key Stage 5 (KS5) General Certificate of Education (A-Levels) 3 or 4 subjects
An Overview

All mainstream schools (but NOT International Schools) have to follow the National Curriculum which is divided into four key stages relevant to each age group. The core subjects are English and Mathematics. Science is included for stages 2 and 3.

Other subjects in the curriculum are Technology (including Information Technology), History, Geography, Modern Foreign Language, Art & Design, Music, and Physical Education, Religous Education and Citizenship. These are not tested as part of the first 2 key stages of the National Curriculum but schools are free to perform their own tests.

At the end of each Key Stage (Years 2, 6 and 9 in which your child is going to be 7, 11 or 14) all pupils are entered for the national tests and teacher assessments. The tests give an independent measure of how pupils and schools are doing compared with the national standards in these subjects.

School Reports

At least once a year schools must give parents a written report on how their children are doing in all subjects. This report will also explain how parents can arrange to discuss comments in the report with their teachers.

If a child is 7, 11, or 14, the report will also include their results in the national tests. It will show how these results compare with other children of the same age. The report will also give the results of any public examinations, such as GCSEs, that the child has taken during the year.

Key Stage 1 (Year 2 - Age 7)

In Year 2 your child will do Key Stage tasks and tests in English and mathematics, which are designed to fit into normal classroom activities. Most children will be able to do the tasks that are set for them, and many children will also take the tests. Your child can complete the tasks between January and June, and take the tests at any time during May.

Key Stage 2 (Year 6 - Age 11) & Key Stage 3 (Year 9 - Age 14)

In Years 6 and 9 your child is tested in English, mathematics and science. The questions are the same for all children in the year. Schools can use the results from the tests to compare the progress of their pupils with that of children in other schools. If necessary, teachers can then change the way their pupils are being taught.

Key Stage 4 (Years 10 & 11 - Age 14 to 16)

Students study up to 10 subjects for their GCSE Examinations (General Certificate of Secondary Education).

The results are graded A to F. E is a pass and B is considered a good pass. School performances are measured on the number of passes of grade C and above. At least 5 passes at grade A to C are needed for students to go on to higher education.

Qualifications

The UK National Academic Recognition Information Centre (UK NARIC) provides an advisory service for those who have to relate overseas academic qualifications to qualifications awarded in the UK. Their contat details are as follows:

UK NARIC, Oriel House, Oriel Road, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, GL50 1XP

Phone: +44 (0)871 330 7033
Fax: +44 (0)871 330 7005

Email: info@naric.org.uk
www.naric.org.uk

NURSERY SCHOOLS

Information on this page is extracted from the Direct.gov web site. It is aimed at parents who require nursery or child care services for their pre-school age children. As part of our relocation services we will always help parents to find a suitable nursery or day care centre.

Types of Early Education

Depending on where you live, you'll find good quality early education in a variety of places:

State Nursery Schools

State nursery schools take children from the age of three or four. They are open during school term time and normally offer five half-day sessions a week. There must be at least one qualified teacher and one qualified nursery assistant for every 20 children.

Nursery Classes in State Primary Schools

Nursery classes in state primary schools take children from the age of three or four. They are open during school term time and normally offer five half-day sessions a week. There must be at least one qualified teacher and one qualified nursery assistant for every 26 children.

Reception Classes in State Primary Schools

Reception classes take children at four or five. Some start children off with half day sessions and build up to full time attendance. The staff are qualified teachers and many have also been specially trained to work with children under 5.

Private Nursery Schools

Most private nursery schools take children between the ages of two and five. They offer half or full-day sessions and some stay open in the school holidays.

Playgroups

Pre school playgroups generally take children between the ages of three and five, although some take children from the age of two and a half. Most playgroups offer half-day sessions. Not all are open all day or for the whole week, but some provide longer hours for parents who want it. They are usually non-profit making and managed by volunteers, often including parents. Many parents are also involved in the activities playgroups provide for children. There must be at least one adult for every eight children and at least half of the adults must be qualified leaders or assistants.

Day Nurseries

Day nurseries take children under five for the whole working day. They may be run by Local Authorities, voluntary organisations, private companies or individuals, or by employers. Children attend part-time or full-time, depending on their parents' needs. There must be at least one adult for every eight children and at least half of the staff must have a qualification recognised by the Local Authority. A number of day nurseries accept younger children, usually from six months and up, providing high quality day care with a higher staff / baby ratio, and allowing both parents to return to work should they wish.

Childminders

Childminders look after children under five as well as school age children after hours and in the school holidays. Childminders usually look after children in the childminder's own home. The Local Authority decides how many children a childminder can look after. Childminders are able to register as part of a network to provide early education.

Integrated Services

An increasing number of settings are now providing both early education and childcare services which parents may find particularly helpful and convenient. Some settings may also offer other family support services such as adult education and health visitors on site or on an outreach basis. The Government is encouraging this and one way is through their funding of a number of Early Excellence Centres around the country. At present there are 35 Centres throughout the country, though this number will increase significantly in the future.

SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATION

If you have a child with special educational needs The Relocation Bureau is available to assist you in finding an appropriate school located near to where you will be living in the UK.

More Info
Mainstream Schools

Most children in the UK with special needs are educated in mainstream state or independent schools but there are also a number of schools in the UK for those who require more specialised facilities.

All state schools have a senior member of their teaching staff responsible for coordinating the special educational needs of their pupils. Often funding for extra staff and extra facilities will be made available to ensure their needs are met.

The gov.uk website have pages on dedicated to special educational needs which are essential reading for concerned parents.
www.gov.uk/topic/schools-colleges-childrens-services/special-educational-needs-disabilities

Children with special educational needs have learning difficulties which makes it much harder for them to learn than most children of the same age.

Professional Help

There are many sources of professional help to guide parents who are concerned about their child's development including Educational Psychologists, Child Psychotherapists, and Child and Family Consultation Services. The special educational needs coordinator at your child's school will be available to offer guidance.

Specialist Schools

Specialist schools are available for a wide range of disabilities and special needs. The Gabbitas 'Guide to Schools for Special Needs' is an excellent additional source of information for parents. (Gabbitas are respected Educational Consultants in the UK). The Relocation Bureau have copies for reference for their clients.

Useful Websites
  • British Dyslexia Association

    Their website provides advice on how to choose a school specialising in the education of dyslexic children.
    www.bdadyslexia.org.uk

  • National Autistic Scoiety

    How to choose the best school for your child with autism.
    www.autism.org.uk

  • Down's Syndrome Association

    Information and guidance for parents of children with Down's Syndrome.
    www.downs-syndrome.org.uk/for-new-parents

  • British Epilepsy Association

    Most children and young people with epilepsy attend ordinary schools, colleges and universities. You will probably find that most teachers and helpers are accepting and helpful once they know what is involved in your child's condition. Some schools have a written policy on epilepsy - the school nurse will be able to help you. (Information from British Epilepsy Association)
    www.epilepsy.org.uk/info/education/epilepsy-in-schools-in-england

  • National Deaf Children's Society

    Information and guidance for parents of deaf children.
    www.ndcs.org.uk/family_support

  • Royal National Institute for the Blind

    Information and guidance for parents of blind children.
    www.rnib.org.uk/information-everyday-living/family-friends-and-carers

  • Cystic Fibrosis Trust

    This may be helpful for teachers who have little or no experience of children with CF or for the parents of CF children who are starting or changing school.
    www.cysticfibrosis.org.uk

School Travel & Transport

Children will find the buses used in the UK are more comfortable than the standard school bus used in the USA. The information below is from the direct .gov website.

Entitlement to School Transport

If your children are attending their nearest suitable school (even if it in a different local authority area or is an independent school) and that school is beyond statutory walking distance (two miles for pupils under the age of eight, or three miles for pupils aged between eight and sixteen), your LEA (Local Education Authority) will provide free transport to and from school.

If your children do not attend their nearest suitable school the LEA may still help by paying all or part of their travelling expenses, or by allowing them to use spare seats on school buses.

It is up to the LEA to decide whether to make any concessions of this sort, and they may be withdrawn if circumstances change - for example, if spare seats are needed for pupils who have an entitlement to free transport.

The direct .gov website has further information available.
www.gov.uk/help-home-school-transport

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATIONS

Schools in the UK which are affiliated to religions are widely available.

The Relocation Bureau will be pleased to help you find an appropriate school to educate your child according to your religious beliefs.

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Anglican - Church of England

Each diocese has a network of Church schools. Most dioceses have a policy of welcoming children of all faiths or none, from within their school catchment area. Visit the Anglican website for information on their church schools.
www.churchofengland.org/education/church-schools-academies.aspx

If you want your children to go to a Church school, ask the school for a brochure. The brochure will tell you whether the school is a Voluntary Aided Church School or a Voluntary Controlled Church School and if there are any criteria for admission. You can also ask to see how the school does in relation to national tests.

Catholic

This hyperlink provides a list of schools offering a Catholic education in the UK.
www.cesew.org.uk/section.asp?id=12

The Relocation Bureau have a copy of the Catholic Education handbook to help you find a school that provides a Catholic education. The handbook is also available from the Catholic Education Service.

Jewish

These web links are made available to you to help you to find a Jewish education for your children through to University. The choice of schools in the UK is quite extensive.
www.somethingjewish.co.uk

Muslim

This is a comprehensive web site for those seeking a Muslim education in the UK
directory.ams-uk.org/schools_full.asp

The Relocation Bureau will be pleased to help you with any enquiries, please click through to our contact form below.

Enquire

STATE SCHOOLS

Most State Schools are administered by the Local Education Authorities (LEAs) and are funded from national taxes and local council tax revenues.

Some State Schools have opted to become 'Grant Maintained Schools' where their funding is provided directly from central government and not via the Local Education Authority (LEA). In these cases they opt out of the LEA control and are free to administer their own affairs within the guidelines set by The Department for Education.

All state schools have to follow the National Curriculum.

To help you choose a school appropriate for your child's needs all primary and secondary schools are required to publish a prospectus giving details of educational, religious and social attitudes. Contact the school for a copy.

The Relocation Bureau will be pleased to help.

More Info

Some parents move house to an area where schools are known to provide a better education, especially for children aged 11 to 18. It is essential that you get them into a good secondary school.

State Primary Schools

State primary schools are for children aged 5 to 11. They start in infant School at aged 5 and move on to junior School at aged 8. The infant and junior schools are sometimes co-located on the same site.

State Secondary Schools

State secondary schools are for those aged 11 to 18. Selecting a good secondary school is essential if your children are to realise their full potential.

Primary Schools

For Children Aged 5 to 11

Children start in infant or first school at aged 5 and move on to junior or middle school at aged 8. The infant and junior schools are sometimes co-located on the same site.

School Hours

School hours are usually from 09.00 to 15.00 or 15:30 with a one hour break for lunch at 12.00.

School Uniform

Most schools require a school uniform. Uniforms are often a sweatshirt with the school name and logo emblazoned across the front, white shirt, grey shorts (for boys) and grey skirt (for girls). This is only an example, colours will vary according to a school's standards and policy.

National Curriculum

All schools have to follow the National Curriculum. Subjects include Maths, English, Science, Art, Music and Physical Education. Children often have an option of being taught to play a musical instrument and often learn to play a recorder in infant schools progressing to a choice from a full range of instruments in junior school such as violin, clarinet and flute.

School Prospectus

To help you choose a school appropriate for your child's needs all primary schools are required to publish a prospectus giving details of educational, religious and social attitudes. Contact the school for a copy.

Open Days / Evenings

All schools have formal occasions when teachers are available to discuss your child's progress and any concerns that you may have. You will be notified when these are scheduled (at least once a year) and invited to make an appointment. If at any time you or the teachers have any concerns with your child's education then appointments can be made on an ad-hoc basis.

Infant or First School

Infant schools, known in some areas First Schools, serve their local community and as such your child will automatically be entitled to attend the school in your area. It is advisable to register your child's name and address with the school during the year before your child's 5th birthday. If you have recently moved into an area you will need to contact the Head Teacher as soon as possible. The Relocation Bureau will help clients in securing a school place.

It is possible for your child to attend a school outside your local community if this is your preference. However, there are limited places which will be allocated to the local community first and if there are still places available your preference may be accommodated. You will need to contact the Head Teacher to discuss the options available.

National Curriculum Tests

In Year 2 (age 7) your child will do Key Stage tasks and tests in English and Mathematics, which are designed to fit into normal classroom activities.

The tasks/tests for 7 year olds cover:

  • Reading
  • Writing (including handwriting)
  • Spelling
  • Mathematics

Teacher assessment for 7 year olds covers:

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science
Junior or Middle School

Your child will move to Junior or Middle school by age 8.

Where First and Middle schools are located on the same site most children usually progress through both schools, so your child will move with the same group of children.

There may be more than one school serving your community and you have the option of registering your child with your preferred choice of school. A place will automatically be offered at your nearest school but if this is not your preferred choice then you will need to contact the Head Teacher to discuss your options.

National Curriculum Tests

In Year 6 (age 11) your child is tested in English, Mathematics and Science. The questions are the same for all children in the year. Schools can use the results from the tests to compare the progress of their pupils with that of children in other schools. If necessary, teachers can then change the way their pupils are being taught.

The tests for 11 year olds cover:

  • Reading
  • Writing (including handwriting)
  • Spelling
  • Mathematics
  • Mental arithmetic
  • Science

Teacher assessment for 11 year olds covers:

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science

Secondary Schools

For children ages 11 to 16 (or 18)

Children start in Secondary School at aged 11 and either leave permanent education at 16 after sitting GCSEs, or move to a college or sixth form till age 18.

School Hours

School hours are usually from 09.00 to 15.30 or 16.00 with a one hour break for lunch sometime between 12.00 to 14.00

School Uniform

Most schools require a school uniform. A boys uniform will typically consist of a blazer with a school badge embroidered onto the top pocket, a school tie, white or grey shirt with grey or black trousers. A girls uniform may also consist of a blazer, tie, shirt and skirt/trousers or a dress in the school colours.

National Curriculum

All schools have to follow the National Curriculum and many offer a wider curriculum with many extra-curricula activities.

Open Days / Evenings

All schools have formal occasions when teachers are available to discuss your child's progress and any concerns that you may have. You will be notified when these are scheduled (at least once a year) and invited to make an appointment. If at any time you or the teachers have any concerns with your child's education then appointments can be made on an ad-hoc basis.

Choosing a School

Selecting a good secondary school is essential if your children are to realise their full potential. At age 16 and 18 the main UK school examinations are taken which are the gateway to a place at university or other higher education.

Many parents who have concerns about the quality of education available in state schools in their area opt, at great expense, to send their children to Independent schools. An alternative is to move to an area where state schools are known to provide a higher quality education and many parents do so.

School Prospectus

To help you choose a school appropriate for your child's needs all schools are required to publish a prospectus giving details of educational, religious and social attitudes. Contact the school for a copy.

Selection Process

State secondary education within most UK education authorities will be in comprehensive schools.

Some education authorities have a selection process based on an examination at age 11. These same authorities offer a two-tier secondary education system with a choice of grammar school or comprehensive school. The results of the examination at 11 will determine the type of school most appropriate for your child with the more academic children being selected for a grammar school.

Grammar school education is highly regarded and considered as good as the education offered by most independent schools. The prospectus for the Royal Grammar School for boys in High Wycombe is a good example. Dr Challoner's High School is typical of a girls grammar school in Buckinghamshire.

www.rgshw.com
challonershigh.com

You will be invited to select up to 3 Comprehensive schools (and 3 Grammar schools if available in your area). All Secondary schools have formal evenings that allow prospective parents to meet the staff and view the facilities that the school has to offer so that an informed choice can be made.

Please be aware that schools with a good reputation may be oversubscribed with applicants and you may not succeed with your first choices.

Higher Education

Continuing formal school education after taking GCSE examinations at age 16 is optional.

A minimum of 5 good passes at GCSE is required to go on to the 2-year GCE 'A' Level course.

The 2-year 'A' Level course can be taken at a different school or college, subject to places being available. Good 'A' Level results are the gateway to university.

There are also many colleges and technical schools that specialise in vocational courses and many students take this option at aged 16 or even at 18 in preference to University.

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Choosing a school for your children can be a difficult time for a family moving to the UK. The educational choices are many. Many parents from overseas will choose to have their children educated at a private/independent school or even at a specialist international school.

The Relocation Bureau has a comprehensive School Search programme and years of experience to help you find the right school for your children.

More Info

The information on this page is there to help you to understand the choices available to you.

Independent Schools

Most children at independent schools are day pupils.They tend to be drawn from a wider area than those at state schools. Often day pupils travel 15 miles or more to school. Many schools make special transport arrangements but, in choosing schools you should consider the public transport available.

Admission & Selection

Once you have done your research and decided on a short list of appropriate schools you will need to find out about their admission and selection procedures.

The Relocation Bureau can help you with your research, find out the admission and selection procedures, obtain a school prospectus and make the necessary arrangements for you with schools that have places available.

Entrance Tests

Many junior schools and even some senior schools admit pupils on a first-come-first-served basis, so early application is advised.

However, most independent senior schools set an entrance test. The difficulty of these tests and the standard required for admission varies and will be related to the type of school.

Some schools which admit on the basis of performance in the Common Entrance Examination, taken in June, are also very selective, admitting only students with the highest marks. Others, however, take a much wider range of ability after an interview and a simple test.

Preparatory Schools

Preparatory Schools cover the nursery (pre-preparatory) and primary stages of education from ages 4 to 13.

Many Preparatory Schools specialise in preparing pupils for the Common Entrance Examination for independent senior schools. Boys usually take this at 13, girls at 11 or 12. Many parents choose prep schools to give their children a good foundation without necessarily intending them to go on to independent senior schools.

Although Prep schools are aware of the National Curriculum, they do not have to stick to it. Unlike state primary schools, they employ specialist teachers to teach individual subjects, especially to older pupils. They have smaller classes than state schools (usually between 15 and 20 to a class) so that teachers can give more time and attention to individual needs. Around half of all prep schools offer some boarding facilities.

High March School, Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire is typical of many Preparatory Schools in the UK.
www.highmarch.co.uk

Senior Schools

The choice of senior schools is very wide; single sex schools for girls or boys only, boys’ schools which admit girls at the age of 16 and co-educational schools for parents who want girls and boys to be educated together.

Many schools are small, while the larger ones are often divided into houses of between 40 and 60 pupils each. The traditional grammar schools usually cater for day pupils only. They select children for their academic ability by examination, usually in January for entry at 11+ the following September.

Most pupils stay on after 16 and go into the sixth form, taking "A-levels", before going on to higher education at colleges and universities.

Most independent schools offer a wide choice of examination subjects at GCE Advanced level ("A-levels"), though an increasing number now offer vocational courses (GNVQ) too.

Boarding Schools

The UK has more than 600 schools which offer boarding facilities.

These range from schools which are all boarding or very close to it, to mainly day schools which offer boarding facilities for a few pupils.

An increasing number of schools offer weekly boarding, where the pupil comes home at weekends. With modern boarding, you have a wider choice of school with boarders having access to a wider range of facilities and activities.

Most boarding schools have day places too, so children can start off as day pupils and convert to boarding later if it attracts them.

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS

Many parents will require their children to be educated to a similar standard and in a similar environment to the schools in their own country. The UK has many International Schools that provide a programme leading to a traditional American diploma for acceptance into American colleges and universities; or the International Baccalaureate diploma for worldwide university access.

The schools listed on this page are a small selection of some of the schools in and around London, with supporting information extracted from their own websites. There are many others.

The Relocation Bureau can help smooth the way for you.

More Info
American Community Schools (ACS), England

Designed originally to meet the educational needs of American families based in London, The American Community Schools, England, have evolved to serve both American and International families with dynamic, friendly campuses and small classes.

Three locations close to London, near Heathrow and Gatwick Airports via the M-25 Motorway, provide well-equipped facilities for students from 3-18 years old. In stately country settings in Cobham, Egham, and Hillingdon, students may choose either a programme leading to the traditional American diploma for acceptance into American colleges and universities or the International Baccalaureate diploma for worldwide university access.
www.acs-schools.com

ACS is accredited on both sides of the Atlantic and the flexible curriculum is designed to facilitate the easy transition back to schools in America and other countries.

The International School of London

The International School of London (ISL) was founded in 1972 and serves the needs of the international community in London.

Curriculum: The programme from reception to GCSE seeks to follow the English National Curriculum, but special consideration is given to native languages other than English, such as Arabic, Danish, Turkish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Japanese, Italian, Afrikaans, Dutch, Norwegian, Russian and Polish. Where necessary, English is also taught as a second language (ESL). The International Baccalaureate programme is offered in the Sixth Form.

www.islschools.org/london/home

The American School in London

A co-educational, independent school in St Johns Wood with over 1,200 international students, in Kindergarten 1 through Grade 12. A rigorous, innovative college-preparatory American curriculum, small classes, close student-teacher relationships, experiential learning that takes advantage of our unique location, and an extensive extra-curricular program characterize our educational philosophy.
www.asl.org

The European School Culham

The European School at Culham, near Abingdon in Oxfordshire, is an EC-funded multilingual school for students from Europe or from families where two European languages are spoken. Priority is given to the children of employees of EC institutions and facilities and therefore space is hard to find. The school provides a high quality education in Nursery, Primary (for 5 years) and Secondary (for 7 years) education.
www.esculham.eu

Dwight School London

Dwight School London (formerly Woodside Park International School and The North London International School) is located in North London near the London Underground stations of West Finchley, Woodside Park, and Totteridge and Whetstone on the Northern line. Other nearby stations are Arnos Grove and New Southgate. The following information is taken from their website.

"The international dimension is an important part of the school. Our staff and pupils come from all over the world, which not only teaches us about various cultures and religions, but also about tolerance and understanding. We have over 35 nationalities on our student body.

Classes are small, facilities are excellent, staff are committed and our pupils are treated as individuals. Within this supportive environment, pupils are challenged to learn, discover, think, develop new interests and to take responsibility for themselves and for others."

www.dwightlondon.org

Marymount International School for Girls

Marymount International School, an independent college-preparatory school for girls aged 11 to 18, enrolls day students and boarders in Grades 6-12. Located on a seven-acre campus in an exclusive residential area in Kingston, north-east Surrey (forty minutes by car from Gatwick and Heathrow Airports), the school enjoys easy rail and road access to central London.

Middle School and High School syllabuses are based on American curricula, integrated in Grades 6-10 with the Middle Years Programme, and in Grades 11-12 with the International Baccalaureate Diploma programme, designed to enable High School graduates to attend major universities in Britain, the USA and elsewhere.

www.marymountlondon.com

The American School in England TASIS

TASIS England, frequently cited as the premier American school in the United Kingdom, is now into its third decade of offering an American college-preparatory curriculum to day students from grades Pre-K through - 12 and to boarding students from grades 9-12. The school is located at Thorpe, south-west of Heathrow Airport, and close by the M25 / M3 motorway junction.

Hurtwood House, Dorking

Hurtwood House school offers education to both foreign and English students and specialises exclusively in the 16-18 age range.

"We combine the best of public school with the best of sixth form college. We believe that students need the care and attention that can be provided in a well-structured, closely-knit boarding community, that can respond fully to the needs of each individual".

england.tasis.com

International Community School, London

The International Community School is a small yet professional and caring school situated in the heart of London. The school was established in 1979 and it offers a mainstream British-based curriculum to children aged 3 to 18 years, as well as all year round intensive courses in English for Education.
www.icschool.co.uk

Buckswood School, Guestling

Buckswood is an International Boarding School for children aged 10 to 19 years, with 160 students and over 30 nationalities including English day students. Buckswood follows the British Curriculum (GCSE's and A level) but can also offer Intensive English Courses. Girls and boys are educated as part of an international community and small classes ensure that they receive more individual attention.
www.buckswood.co.uk

King Fahad Academy, London

The King Fahad Academy in London is an independent school providing education for children of Muslim faith aged 5 to 19 living in London. In addition to Islamic studies and Arabic language, the syllabus of the Academy offers British GCSE and A Level subjects in both science and arts.
www.thekfa.org.uk

Southbank International School

Southbank International School is an independent school founded in 1979. It aims to provide an individualised academic programme for students from diverse cultural backgrounds. The school has three campuses located in Hampstead, Kensington and Westminster, where it offers to its students all three International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes: Primary Years programme (PYP) 3-11 years; Middle Years programme (MYP) 11-16 years; IB Diploma (IB DP) 16-18 years.

"Although the school is not highly selective in its intake, our students go on to be high achievers. Virtually all graduating students go on to university (in the UK or the USA) and their examination results place Southbank in the top division of schools in Britain for academic performance."

www.southbank.org

EF International Language Schools

For adults 16 and over. Learn English with the leaders in the language study business. EF courses are US university-certified. All course programs are certified by Suffolk University, an accredited member of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. We're also accredited by ACCET and, in the UK, are approved by The British Council and are members of ARELS.

St Clare's College, Oxford

St. Clare's was founded in 1953 as an independent, international college. It was set up to establish links between British and other European students after the Second World War, and is a non-profit making educational charity.

In March 1999 St. Clare's acquired the Oxford Academy, a well established English language school. St. Clare's is now the largest private English language provider in Oxford.

Schools Map

If you would like to view a map of schools in a specific area, you can search using the box below and then click Launch Map below to view the map in a new window.

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